Author Topic: Kold fusion i almindelige fluorescerence lys-pærer  (Read 445 times)

anders

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Kold fusion i almindelige fluorescerence lys-pærer
« on: August 26, 2014, 10:17:10 am »
Der forekommer åbenbart en grundstof omdannelse i alminelige fluorescerende pærer
http://www.slideshare.net/lewisglarsen/lattice-energy-llcare-lenrs-occurring-in-compact-fluorescent-lightsmarch-7-2013

Det er lidt ironisk, når de herskende kræfter har gjort så meget for at holde den kolde fusion nede.

/Anders



anders

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Re: Kold fusion i almindelige fluorescerence lys-pærer
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2016, 10:43:14 pm »
http://www.veteranstoday.com/2014/10/18/vt-science-nasas-low-energy-fusion-voodoodoodoo/

Tiny Nuclear Reactions Inside Compact Fluorescent Bulbs?
TECH  3/14/2013
Has the focus on these new energy sources been throttled by the oil industry?

Has the focus on these new energy sources been throttled by the oil industry?

Harmless low-energy nuclear reactions may be taking place routinely inside of compact fluorescent lightbulbs, according to a physicist whose theories have NASA researchers abuzz with the prospect of cheap, non-polluting energy.

Nuclear reactions may be responsible for an unusual fingerprint of mercury isotopes in used fluorescents that can identify environmental pollution from the bulbs, said Lewis Larsen, a Chicago physicist associated with the Widom-Larsen Theory, which explores slow nuclear reactions among elements that are not radioactive.

“Unbeknownst to the general public, dynamically active nuclear processes are presently occurring in tens of millions of households worldwide,” Larsen told me.

“Fortunately, there aren’t any radiological health risks associated with CFLs because no hard radiation is emitted from them, ” Larsen said, “ and no environmentally hazardous, long-lived radioactive isotopes are typically created by LENRs (low energy nuclear reactions).”

Larsen has suspected low energy nuclear reactions occur in CFLs, he told me, and is encouraged by a February study of used bulbs that found isotopes of mercury that more conventional theories cannot explain.

The authors of that study analyzed used fluorescent bulbs looking for a unique fingerprint of mercury isotopes. If they could find a unique fingerprint, researchers could identify mercury pollution in the environment that comes from discarded fluorescents:

“All fluorescent lamps use mercury (Hg) and can be a source of Hg to the environment when broken,” write the authors, led by Chris Mead of Arizona State University’s Global Institute of Sustainability, in a February issue of Environmental Science and Technology (subscription required).

As compact fluorescents command a larger share of the lighting market, the researchers expect mercury pollution from the bulbs to increase:

    “The share of atmospheric anthropogenic Hg emissions represented by fluorescent lightbulbs in the United States is 1–5 percent. Only a third of fluorescent lightbulbs are recycled. As fluorescent lighting continues to supplant incandescent lighting, and as emissions from large point sources of Hg, such as coal-fired power plants and municipal waste incinerators are reduced, fluorescents will become an increasingly important source of Hg to the environment. Therefore, a method to detect and quantify Hg derived from fluorescents would be very useful.”

The researchers found their unique fingerprint for mercury from fluorescent bulbs. But they can’t explain why it’s so unique:

“The trapped Hg of used CFL show unusually large isotopic fractionation (the distribution of mercury into its various isotopes), the pattern of which is entirely different from that which has been observed in previous Hg isotope research aside from intentional isotope enrichment.”

Larsen believes he knows why the mercury isotopes in used CFLs are different:

    “When viewed through the conceptual lens of the Widom-Larsen theory, Mead et al.’s carefully collected Hg isotope data suggests that low energy nuclear reaction (LENR) transmutations may actually be occurring at extremely low rates in CFLs during normal operation,” he said.

    And that should make the idea of home nuclear reactors less frightening, Larsen said. “If this outstanding new data is substantiated by further experimentation, it provides yet more proof that LENRs are likely to be a truly ‘green,’ safe nuclear technology.”